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mbumby
My Sleep Study 
18th-Mar-2008 04:02 pm
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I've always needed a lot of sleep. 13 hours is what I think I need. That's per night not per week. (This is not to say I get that very often. The last time I got enough sleep, waking rested, was in 2001. The time before that was 1996.)

When I was in high school, I know I was frequently late, and I seem to recall Rose, the crossing guard at my primary school scolding me for always running late.

Well, things have started to get worse -- I'm more tired -- and my spouse is referring to me as "solar powered" -- so I talked to my doc, who set me up with a Neurologist, who set me up with a sleep study last night, to be followed by a nap study today.



I left work with a couple of hours to spare. Spouse had told me that there was a Wendy's at "the" exit, but I didn't see it, so I went to the hospital and asked my GPS what was local. I "never" eat out unless it's with people other than fast food, but it mentioned Barnes Ribs, and I decided I'd give it a go. Heh. After it told me to turn down a dirt road, I had a bad feeling, and when that dirt road ended as someones driveway that feeling was confirmed. But I had seen some other things as I was driving, so I resolved to do one of them, ending up at the Chelsea Grille and ordering Chicken Marsala. The Tomato Basil soup was wonderful, the broccoli was yummy and the mashed potatoes were heavenly. Oh, and the chicken was okay too.

I got back to the hospital with about a half hour to spare, and managed to forget to bring in my overnight bag. *sigh* I rang the bell, like the sign said, and there was no acknowledgment. But someone else was waiting there, so I waited. After the 3rd person showed up I remembered my bag, still out in my car. Waited to see what they would want me to do -- should I be checked in then go get it, for example, but after the time of my appointment rolled around and I'd still seen neither hide nor hair of anyone other than patients, I said heck with it and went to get my bag.

When I got back, one of the other people was gone, so I was more comfortable waiting. The other guy was brought to his room, and then I was retrieved.

With no direction other than to get into my PJs, I put all of my stuff on the wooden chair, except my shoes, which I put under it. When the nurse came in, she had to move everything -- even the shoes. (Hmmm... I would have dressed (somewhat or) somewhere different(ly) had I realized then that the room was monitored -- I saw the camera later.)

She came in, talked to me, applied about two dozen electrodes and whatnot to various portions of my anatomy -- many of them on my head -- buried in my hair. Of course she first had to take measurements and write on my scalp with a pencil. She said several times that I am too skinny, I cannot have sleep apnea. I would not describe myself as skinny, but given the choice between large and small build, I would admit to having a smaller build. Then suddenly, a bit before 10pm (I'd been told that lights out was at 11pm) she came in and asked if I was ready for bed. Sure.

Then she hooked up a few more sensors, including two that went a little bit into my nose -- the tape for which on my upper lip was quite annoying.

Of course the fact that I could hear conversations (she told me in the morning I was the only quiet one), and I could hear bleed-through from the PA as she talked to others, and I could hear water running, and I itched under where the glue holding the electrodes on was placed, and my nose itched, and the tape on my upper lip was aggravating meant that I didn't sleep much. Or rather, I was awake much.

The next morning (they woke me at 6) I learned that just because she said it three times didn't make it true. I had told her that I don't snore. She said I did a bit -- the first time just audible breathing and the 2nd time a bit louder than that. Spouse has never heard me stop breathing, or gasp for air. I don't wake up with a headache. But, she said that I do seem to have apnea.

I guess I should take comfort from the fact that she didn't say "OMG we need to get you into a mask now or you're going to Diiiiiiie," but I found it very disheartening that it was apparently bad enough that she called the Neurologist to see about canceling the nap study -- because if I have apnea, that needs to be treated first. Guess the doctor overrode.

A bit after 7 they fed me one of the more uninteresting (ok, for hospital food it was probably pretty good) breakfasts I've ever had. At 8 I went down for a nap. I know I slept. Not sure I dreamt. At 10 I went down for a nap. Slept for sure. At 11 they gave me lunch -- I got a pesto pasta thing, and broccoli... that ... if that's the only broccoli a kid has ever had, I can support him hating broccoli. But the pasta was good. At noon I got another nap, and again slept. At 2pm, there were lots of noises -- conversations, rain, water running, and I was already starting to plan what I was going to do when I left, and I did not fall asleep. Each of these times they only left me down for 20 minutes.

She removed the electrodes and told me to shower and then I could leave. Their water pressure left something to be desired, but the temperature was good, and I eventually got, I think, all of the glue out of my hair.

Yes, in case you're wondering, I'm yawning as I type this.

But it's time to run off for food and class.

And then wait 3.5 weeks to talk to the Neurologist and learn what's up.
Comments 
19th-Mar-2008 02:46 pm (UTC)
If you went to the university, the report will go to your doc, and that's where I got my copy.

It's an interesting read. Turned out I stopped breathing every 8 minutes, or so. Scary. Never made it to stage 4, mostly went between 1 and 2, with most time spent in 1. No wonder I was so tired!

Not all, but some of my depression was from lack of sleep. As I said, you'll be amazed at what a difference good sleep can make.
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